I just read a great article in Start Up Nation Online. It describes customer service in pretty stark terms: people notice either really good or really bad customer service.

A quick search of  tweets on “QuickBooks” from the last 24 hours shows the following:

  • installing quickbooks required me to call support to register the product. No web based reg? have to call? really? sheesh.
  • I want to integrate my bank transactions with Quickbooks Online Plus, no one at your bank’s 800 # has a clue, any help?
  • Is QuickBooks Online down for anyone else this morning? #needtopaypayrolltaxes

A tweet on the positive side: The QuickBooks Balance for those using online banking has been added back to the homepage per QB Online user requests. Yeah feedback! !

And another positive example: @RebeccaTervoCPA Just had a potential client call to say “My Quickbooks are a mess, and I need them fixed for the bank by next Thursday!” I’ll try my best:)

So it gets me thinking. What makes for a really great QuickBooks customer service or support experience? These tweets plus my own experience suggest these qualities:

  • Great communication: Listening to users and responding with action
  • Great empathy: Responding to the urgency of the problem.
  • Great competence: Dealing with someone who is an expert.
  • Great timeliness: Getting  a quick and effective solution to the problem.

What would make for a really bad software support experience?

  • Poor communications: Having difficulty finding out the status of what’s going on.
  • Poor relationship: Being treated primarily as an upsell prospect
  • Poor system: Being put on hold for a long time.

No support organization is perfect. It’s great that Twitter makes it easy to feel the pulse of the QuickBooks user; all of us who support QuickBooks can adjust and improve the way we serve end users.

When QuickbooksUsers.com helps someone with a software issue, we often send them a “How did we do?” questionnaire to get feedback. We use that feedback to tweak what we do. But maybe we have some blind spots. Let me know…

Do you have anything to add to the list of what makes great or awful service and support?

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Here are four ideas to be more successful with QuickBooks for the balance of this year:

1. Make a good backup plan, and implement it. Talk to your local IT pro or give us a call for practical advice on this. Everyone knows they should have good regular backups. Studies show that 90% don’t follow through. But you go ahead! If your computer crashes later this year, you will thank me. Yes! You will.

2. Get your versions of QuickBooks, Windows, and your hardware all lined up. Don’t run QuickBooks 2005 under Windows 7. Or run QuickBooks 2010 on a PC you bought in 2005. Hardware, operating system, and applications work together best when they were produced around the same time.

3. Make QuickBooks work harder for you. It can do more than just pay your bills and reconcile your bank account, you know? Have you ever showed your QuickBooks reports to someone who can interpret them for you and tell you how you could tweak your business to make it way more profitable? That’s where some hidden accounting beauty lies…in the potential bottom line. Talk to your CPA, to a virtual CFO, or talk to us to get connected to one. You’ll spend a little, but maybe save or make a lot.

4. If you are using QuickBooks 2010, check out some of the optional services/apps. Online document management, online check depositing, email marketing…there are lots of new services to consider that can help save time or create new revenue.

Are you going to try anything new with QuickBooks this year?

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I got a call last week from someone running accounting software on her Apple IIe computer.

If you don’t know the Apple IIe, it is *not* the latest Mac product. It was, in fact, Apple’s state-of-the-art computer in 1982.

The lady has been using her old accounting software (not QuickBooks) on her old computer for almost 30 years. Without any problems. This week, the original floppy program disks finally wore out and gave up.

Which raises the question: When should you upgrade your accounting software? My (not original) philosophy: If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. If it’s broke, fix it.

One caveat: If the newer version has new capabilities that you are pretty sure will save you a lot of time, money, or hassle, do the upgrade. QuickBooks 2010 has new capabilities that may well fit that description for you.

But I talk to QuickBooks users sometimes that wish they could go back to an earlier, ‘simpler’ version. I heard a lot of that when the QB 2006 version came out. What an outcry! I heard special pining for the old QB 99 version. I guess 1999 was a very good year for QuickBooks.

If you use QuickBooks payroll services and your version gets so old that Intuit doesn’t support it anymore — it’s broke. Fix it. Intuit only supports releases going back three versions.

If you are trying to use an old version of QB on your spankin’ new Win 7 machine, it won’t work. Fix it.

Otherwise, if what you are using now does 90-95% of what you want, I say be happy with what you’ve got.

What do you say?

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You rely on QuickBooks to make lots of important things happen in your business. It’s mission critical.

Paying your bills, your employees, and tracking your cash are just as important to you as to Fortune 500 companies. Here’s the thing, though: the big guys rely on software that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars. Your accounting software of choice? Costs maybe a couple hundred bucks.

The amazing thing is that your small business software can perform the basic (and some not so basic) accounting functions as well as the big guys’ software. Your P&L, balance sheet, and payment processes are probably just as effective as theirs.

And with the ever-increasing number of add-on programs and online solutions available with QuickBooks, your accounting power and options are only going up.

So be encouraged — you are part of the Fortune 4.5 Million (QuickBooks approx. install base). You can produce and *use* accounting information that will help your business succeed. And if that happens, you’ll have something over a lot of the big guys these days.

Do you ever feel at an accounting system disadvantage compared to large companies?

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